Tagged: Music

IMITATION AND THE EVOLUTION OF CULTURE

Let’s [address] the question of how humans acquired music and language, since it helps us to understand the revolutionary power of imitation. Music and language are skills, and skills are not like physical attributes – bigger wings, longer legs: not only can they be imitated, which obviously physical characteristics on the whole can’t, but in the case of music and language they are reciprocal skills, of no use to individuals on their own, though of more than a little use to a group. An account of the development of skills such as language purely by the competitive force of classical natural selection has to contend not only with the fact that the skills could easily be mimicked by those not genetically related, thus seriously eroding the selective power in favour of the gene, but also with the fact that unless they were mimicked they wouldn’t be much use. Imitation would itself have a selective advantage: it would enable those who were skilled imitators to strengthen the bonds that tied them to others within the group, and make social groups stable and enduring. Those groups that were most cohesive would survive best, and the whole group’s genes would do better, or not, depending on the acquisition of shared skills that promote bonding – such as music, or ultimately language. Those individuals less able to imitate would be less well bound into the group, and would not prosper to the same degree.

The other big selective factor in acquiring skills and fitting in with the group would be flexibility, which comes with expansion of the frontal lobes – particularly the right frontal lobe, which is also the seat of social intelligence. Skills are intuitive, ‘inhabited’ ways of being and behaving, not analytically structured, rule-based techniques. So it may be that we were selected – not for specific abilities, with specific genes for each, such as the ‘language gene(s)’ or the ‘music gene(s)’ – not even ‘group selected’ for such genes – but individually for the dual skills of flexibility and the power to mimic, which are what is required to develop skills in general.

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TWENTY SEVENTEEN: IN REVIEW


Preface.  Various factors this year have necessitated a leaner Annual Review.  There follows excerpts from books I have read this year that have influenced my philosophical enquiry, a digest of my favourite songs that have come out in twenty seventeen, and the sections in italics are musings cribbed directly from my notebook for the year, here and there slightly edited, elsewhere slightly embellished.  Caveat:  Do not be drawn in by the dozen sections.  I employed neither linear chronology nor hierarchy in the construction of this review.  Rather, I attempted a spontaneous and holistic approach to writing and compiling.

Adam John Miller, 20th December 2017.


 

Like all genuine questions, the question about identity will never die. Such questions do not have answers, in the sense of a single definitive statement that eliminates the need to ask the question again. Yet that does not mean that talking about such questions is an endless and meaningless game, merely going back and forth over the same positions, more cleverly expressed. Instead, at crucial moments in this long conversation, something emerges that reveals a new truth, perhaps implicit in what has gone before but only now expressed. Because of that insight, everything appears in a new light. Such questions and conversations are living things; they are fascinating because, at any moment, something so compelling may emerge that nothing will be the same again.

Peter Pesic, Seeing Double: Shared Identities in Physics, Philosophy, and Literature

 

Vagabon, The Embers

 


I saw it happen as it was happening to me.  Non-participation an idle fantasy, ultimately impossible.  The bottomless depths and unfathomable heights are signposts, as natural as night and day.  Content provision.  Flicking through the dream diary I catch myself and wince at the opulent naivety: Please wake up now, it says, stopping short.  Perplexed, unsubstantiated.  An elaboration of protocol and rule.  Olive branches, javelins.  The metaphors of mind are the world it perceives.  Downsize your expectations.  An open invitation to the vinegar tasting goes unanswered.  This nearly didn’t happen at all, but the field is more inviting than the stands whilst we wait for the whistle.  Keep it succinct.


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